DANZA AZTECA CALPULLI MEXIHCA

SPONSORED BY KAH 'DAY OF THE DEAD' TEQUILA

KAH Tequila
www.kahtequila.com

THREE SPECIAL PERFORMANCES Starting at 3:15PM, Saturday September 18

PLAZA DE LAS ARMAS IN OLD TOWN SAN DIEGO HISTORIC STATE PARK

Danza Azteca, Calpulli Mexihca Dance Meanings

Dance # 1: Mayahuel (The Maguey Goddess)

This dance commemorates Mayahuel, who is the symbol of the earth’s fertility. When she was transformed into a maguey plant (a species of agave), she bestowed on Mexihca (Mexican) men the gift required for survival. The maguey plant in pre-Hispanic times was considered a sacred plant for the Aztec people. The gifts that this plant provided ranges from pulque, a fermented alcoholic drink, to a source that was used to make clothing, shelter, weapons, paper and many other objects.

Dance # 2: Tochtli (Rabbit)

The rabbit symbol in Aztec iconography is said to represent ideas concerning drunkenness, which had both social and ritual significance in the Aztec culture. Rituals involving the alcoholic drink, pulque, has been represented along with the rabbit symbol to denote fertility and social responsibility in drinking.

Dance #3: La Danza de la Amistad (The Friendship Dance)

This dance is an evolving contemporary piece that Mexican-American Aztec dancing groups created as a symbol of friendship and unity. It was dedicated to the Aztec dancing groups from Mexico and now unites the general audience all over the world. This dance invites people to participate in basic Aztec dancing routines to share the energy and friendship between the Azt ec dancers and their audience.

Please enjoy the mystical magic of San Diego’s Danza Azteca Calpulli Mexihca!!!

About Danza Azteca Calpulli Mexihca

Calpulli Mexihca, meaning, “Mexican big house,” in the Nahuatl Aztec language is a cultural dancing group that was formed in San Diego, California in 2003. The founders of this group are Juan Manuel, Juan Jr., Kenia, Ricardo, Hector and Aida Flores. This group has embraced their Mexihca indigenous culture through dance and education. They also embark Aztec dancing through oral and visual art. Their dances symbolize harmony with nature and the cosmos. Calpulli Mexhica’s goal is to educate their audience, both young and old about their history, culture, and Aztec dancing traditions. Their dances don’t have the purpose of entertaining. Their objective is to illustrate to their audience the beauty of their indigenous culture; the cultural inheritance that their ancestors left them. For further information about this group contact Aida Flores at (619) 339-7261.